Timeless French New Wave Fashion

In which I buy myself a new look and discover it is French New Wave style….

The other day, I went through my closet and saw that I had a lot of clothing that I thought I “should” be wearing at my age, as a mom, rather than what I want to be wearing. I ruthlessly cut out what I didn’t wear or want to wear anymore. All of that went into donation bags.

I embraced the fact that I love to layer and need a lot of long sleeves to keep me warm when I get a chill. I kept all of my fave tank tops, t-shirts and sweaters for that reason. It made me realize that I need more cardigans and sweaters.

Once I had gotten rid of everything I didn’t like in my closet, I made a list of what I felt I needed- nothing as specific as “a striped long sleeve shirt” (although I did end up with one of those),  but general terms, such as “long sleeves”, “bunnyhug or hoodie”, “cardigan” and “new dress”.  Then I made a budget to stick to and decided to shop second hand, since I had to donate the stuff I had gotten rid of, anyway.

One of my new favourite outfits. P.S. Don’t tell anyone that my mirror needs cleaning, okay? 😉

The kids and I went to Value Village with our list. They needed a couple of new books for their library (5 out, 2 in) and Hunter needed new snow-pants while Isabella needed a new shirt. I was on the hunt for a bunnyhug (also known as a pullover or hoodie if you’re not from Saskatchewan), or a zip-up hoodie (known simply as a hoodie or a zipper bunnyhug in Saskatchewan), as well as a long-sleeved shirt, a new dress, and a couple of cardigans for layering. I am basically cold all year because of my terrible circulation and low blood pressure, so I knew that I would get wear out of these all year, even the slowly approaching summertime.

The kids were very patient with me while I picked out some new tops. I love having them around when I’m clothes shopping because they both have an eye for fashion, including subtleties in pattern and colour. Plus, they are still at the age where they are VERY (sometimes painfully) honest and they know me so well that they will flat-out tell me if something doesn’t suit me or isn’t my style. Gosh, my kids are the best. I just love them.

“If you read up on Jean Seberg and Anna Karina’s lives, you will find their lives as fascinating as their fashion sense, although incredibly tragic. I am glad that their legacy lives on, at least in the influence of fashion and film style. It’s timeless, classic and simple (although never, ever boring).”

They stood by while I tried on top after top. I didn’t use a change room, just a mirror in the aisle to put on sweaters over my tank top, so spent a lot of time next to a sweet older Asian woman who was doing the same thing. As I was putting a sweater in the “no” pile, she tapped me on the shoulder and handed me a sweater she had just tried on. She pointed at me and raised her eyebrows, then  pointed at herself and shook her finger and head “no”, then pointed at me and nodded “yes”. I tried it on and I’ll be damned if it didn’t suit me perfectly. I never would have tried on the button-less, long, striped cardigan otherwise. (I promise to put a picture of it on IG soon). I grabbed what I liked and what the kids approved and didn’t worry about how it would go together or why I should like or not like it, according to others.

In the end, I had a lot of pieces that I was very excited about. Along with the items I had to layer under them at home, I essentially had bought myself an entire new look in only 6 pieces.

Now, here’s where I discover I have a subconscious obsession with French New Wave fashion.

That night, I decided I was done with dying my hair with henna because the Lush formula had changed and didn’t seem to stick to my hair anymore. It needed to go, so I had to cut my hair short again. Viva the pixie cut. I made a hair appointment and started to pin pictures for the hairdresser. My fave pixie cut length of all time is Jean Seberg’s pixie cut, especially in my favourite movie, Breathless. I searched for her and fell into an internet hole about Jean Seberg and her style influence, which is mainly New Wave cinema. This followed with a search of Anna Karina, Brigitte Bardot, and Catherine Deneuve. What I found was that I favoured the style of makeup they show in their films and lives, which is simplistic natural makeup with a strong black eyeliner and meticulously crafted brows. Not only that, but I was accidentally following Jean Seberg’s fashion when I bought my new wardrobe: the stripes, the skirts, the oversized shirts (men’s style I can just steal from Josh), the tailored or tighter pants, and even the pixie cut. (You can find out more about  her specific style from these wonderful bloggers HERE and HERE).

“In the end, I had a lot of pieces that I was very excited about. Along with the items I had to layer under them at home, I essentially had bought myself an entire new look in only 6 pieces.”

As I researched more of the French Wave fashion icons, I realized that I had similar pieces in my wardrobe and makeup drawer. I have found my comfort zone. It seems my new favourite films, Breathless and Jules et Jim, must have crawled into my brain. One of my other all-time favourite movies, Amelie, also has a similar feel in its style. Perhaps that is part of its appeal to me.  Unintentionally, I am heavily influenced by French New Wave and inspired films.

If you read up on Jean Seberg and Anna Karina’s lives, you will find their lives as fascinating as their fashion sense, although incredibly tragic. I am glad that their legacy lives on, at least in the influence of fashion and film style. It’s timeless, classic and simple (although never, ever boring).

You can follow me on Instagram at @babblingpanda_wynne where I plan on sharing some outfits, which is new for me….I almost never show fashion on there but my passion for getting dressed has been reignited.

To find out more about French New Wave style, here are my fave web articles:

What’s your fashion influence and style? I would love to hear about it in the comments.
Do you love French New Wave style or film? Let me know so I can follow you! 
Favourite French New Wave film?? 

To keep reading, go here:

Capsule Wardrobes

Building a Wardrobe to be Proud Of.

Decluttering and Unexpected Emotions.

 

 

 

1 Comment

  • interfaith 2018-03-15 at 11:25

    Thanks for this comment, too!

    Reply

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